Cabin Fever, Cattle Egrets, and Pasture-land Partnerships | The Institute for Creation Research
Cabin Fever, Cattle Egrets, and Pasture-land Partnerships
Nowadays, many folks experience “cabin fever,” but are banned from ordinary travel and social activities.1 However, some get out of the house—yet stay home—by investing time and labor outdoors, doing yardwork and gardening.

For many Americans, it is enough of a challenge at this time of year to trim tree branches, remove weeds (hopefully by the roots), add weed-and-feed to lawn grass, mow the grass, and weed-whack wherever needed. Since tending to one’s own yardwork is a permissible outdoor activity, many are using their extra time at home to maintain their lawns.

Yet, in other places where large grassy areas abound—such as ranchlands of America’s Great Plains—wild grasses constitute “all-you-can-eat” pastures for domestic cattle.2 And where you find cattle herds and pastures, you often also find their small white heron-like neighbor Bubulcus ibis, the cattle egret.3 Actually, providential partnering between grass-munching bovines and cattle egrets is an example of neighborly mutualism.

Being a good neighbor is a good standard to live by. Good neighbors help one another. In fact, as the New Testament indicates, it’s the biblical norm for how to treat one’s neighbors.4

To some extent, this type of win-win situation often occurs with cattle egrets over most of the world. They ecologically partner with domesticated bovines (cattle) and other large mammal herbivores such as bison, water buffalo, bison, horses, zebras, donkeys, camels, giraffes, antelope, rhinoceroses, etc.

In short, large mammals graze in tall grasses where bothersome insects (like grasshoppers and crickets) and parasitic ticks abound, stirring up the bugs wherever they walk. As the bugs move, reactively, their own motions betray them as moving targets—and often as fast-food—for the cattle egrets who “chaperone” the pasturing cattle.5 Likewise, cattle egrets are not shy about perching atop cattle to eat whatever insects, ticks, or insect larvae may be trespassing on beleaguered bovine bodies.5

The benefit to the birds is obvious—convenient meals, either on the bovine skin or in the stirred grasses that bovine feet brush against, causing bugs to show themselves as moving targets. The egrets just need to watch out for the bovine hooves.

The cattle benefit as well. They have no hands to dislodge the pestering bugs (many of which are noxious parasites) off their backs or to shoo away bugs that initially flit about near their feet and might soon land on the bovine’s legs or back.

The bugs really bug the bovines! So, the insectivorous habits of the bug-munching birds are a welcome relief, providing blessing to the cattle—assuming egrets live nearby.

Actually, the cattle egret is an African emigrant. Cattle egrets migrated from Africa to South America more than a century ago.5,6 After migrating northward more than 70 years ago, cattle egrets quickly colonized the southern regions of North America, and then expand their ranges further north.5,6 In some parts of America, they are established as seasonal migrants. In other parts, they reside year-round.3

And they are easy to recognize, especially during breeding season. Although the plumage of these egrets is mostly white, accented by yellow bills and yellow legs, during breeding season these egrets have golden “mustard” markings (resembling buff-colored blotches) on their breasts, backs, and crowns. The breeding season begins about around April and lasts until November.3

So, if you live near a pasture where cows are grazing, look at the grass near the cattle’s hooves. You might see a few cattle egrets satisfying their hunger and being a good neighbor.

This helpful association exhibits mutualistic neighborliness, not cutthroat competition. Thus, this mutually beneficial pasture-land partnership clashes with the Darwin’s overly pessimistic portrayal of nature as dominated by “kill-or-be-killed” selfishness.7

So, do the cattle egrets have a lesson for us?

Opportunities abound to be helpful to someone who is (or who is like) a neighbor. In disruptive times—as America eagerly anticipates returning to post-coronavirus normal—it’s good to be reminded that neighborly helpfulness is actually a blessing to both the helpful giver and the recipient.8

References
1. Johnson, J. J. S. When Travel is Restricted, Be Honest and Trust God. Creation Science Update. Posted on ICR.org April 4, 2020, accessed April 7, 2020. 
2. Johnson, J. J. S. 2017. Dung Beetles: Promoters of Prairie Preservation. Acts & Facts. 46(1):21.
3. Peterson, R. T. 1980. Peterson Field Guides: A Completely New Guide to All the Birds of Eastern and Central North America, Volume 1. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin, pages 102-103, and Map # 94.
4. Romans 13:9.
5. Staff writer. 2020. All About Birds: Cattle Egret. The Cornell Lab. Posted on allaboutbirds.org, accessed April 7, 2020.
6. Alerstam, T. 1993. Bird Migration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 45.
7. Neighborly “mutual aid” is actually quite common, ecologically speaking, even in this fallen world. Johnson, J. J. S. 2018. Grand Canyon Neighbors: Pines, Truffles, and Squirrels. Acts & Facts. 47(10): 21.
8. Acts 20:35.

*Dr. Johnson is Associate Professor of Apologetics and Chief Academic Officer at the Institute for Creation Research.
The Latest
NEWS
Support Creation Ministry in Texas and Beyond
ICR scientists and support staff recently completed a two-week science expedition through the Great Plains and western mountain states to conduct scientific...

NEWS
Great Unconformity Best Solved by Global Flood
The Great Unconformity is one of the most baffling mysteries in the geological sciences.1 It is marked by a massive surface of erosion that...

NEWS
ICR’s 2021 Science Expedition Update–Dinosaur Fossils
A team of 11 people from the Institute for Creation Research is currently traveling on a multistate science expedition to dig up fossils, conduct field...

NEWS
ICR’s 2021 Science Expedition Update
A team of 11 people from the Institute for Creation Research is currently traveling on a multistate science expedition to dig up fossils, conduct field...

NEWS
ICR’s 2021 Science Expedition Begins!
The Institute for Creation Research launched its 2021 multistate science expedition last week as a nine-member team left the ICR headquarters in Dallas,...

NEWS
Inside September 2021 Acts & Facts
Why does ICR focus on scientific research? How could paleontologists mistake a lizard fossil for a dinosaur? Is animal death before the Fall theologically...

ACTS & FACTS
Creation Kids: Beauty by Design
Christy Hardy and Susan Windsor* You’re never too young to be a creation scientist! Kids, discover fun facts about God’s creation with...

ACTS & FACTS
Defend Your Faith with ICR
Have you ever heard a pastor question the historical nature of Genesis? “The days of creation weren’t really 24 hours long. The Bible is...

ACTS & FACTS
Animal Death Before the Fall?
Both the Old and New Testaments teach that death entered the world when Adam ate the forbidden fruit (e.g., Genesis 2:17 and Romans 5:12). Since fossils...

APOLOGETICS
Transmitting Truth in a Modern Pagan World
We share the world with modern pagans who worship the sun—or idolize an imagined primordial Big Bang—so we need to be truth witnesses unto...