The Molecular Language of Our Gut Bacteria | The Institute for Creation Research
The Molecular Language of Our Gut Bacteria

Every person is an important ecosystem for a wide variety of microorganisms. Whether it’s the bacterial collection of coliforms in our large intestine, streptococci in our mouth, or the diptheroids on our skin, it’s the normal flora or normal microbiota. The microbial colonization of our gut, for example, supports the digestion of complex nutritional components and activates anatomical changes of the intestine. This total collection of flora is called the microbiome1 and it continues to amaze scientists. For example,

Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts; they can also tell the genes in their mammalian hosts what to do.2
 
This is yet another fascinating discovery of microbiome function. Research by Jonathan Stamler, M.D. has uncovered a form of “interspecies communication” regarding the microbiome. Nitric oxide (an important signaling molecule in many physiological processes) is secreted by bacteria “that allows them to communicate with and control their hosts’ DNA, and suggests that the conversation between the two may broadly influence human health.”2 Although not mentioned in the article, this chemical communication channel is monitored by the microbe interface (the human immune) system.3 This interspecies communication investigation points to the importance of the microbiome and the designed microbe interface system created to be a bridge of communication between it and the host.
 
Using logic rather than philosophy (evolution was not mentioned in the ScienceDaily article) Stamler and his team predicted that there would be a common language utilized by the bacteria comprising the microbiome. Furthermore, this common language would be a form of communication researchers could identify. They found it to be this free radical, nitric oxide, a wide-ranging mechanism by which gut bacteria can communicate with human and mammalian hosts. Specifically, nitric oxide was found to attach to thousands of human proteins in a carefully regulated manner of cellular signaling called S-nitrosylation. This occurs by covalent (chemical) attachment of nitric oxide to the amino acid cysteine. S-nitrosylation is found in everything from plants and bacteria to all mammalian cells.      
 
In this study, they used the gut bacteria that secreted nitric oxide within the tiny nematode C. elegans to see how the worm could completely change its “ability to regulate its own gene expression.” The scientists then chose a protein called argonaute, or ALG-1, that turns off unnecessary genes when nitric oxide attaches to it including important developmental genes—too much nitric oxide therefore impairs healthy development. They determined mammalian hosts in the wild can “adjust to accommodate changing nitric oxide levels” so this doesn’t happen.

Evolution has nothing to do with this critical symbiotic relationship. It appears Nitric oxide signaling was clearly designed. Tweet: Evolution has nothing to do with this critical symbiotic relationship. It appears Nitric oxide signaling was clearly designed.

The Molecular Language of Our Gut Bacteria: https://www.icr.org/article/molecular-language-gut-bacteria/

@ICRscience

#Science #Research

Nitric oxide signaling is one more fascinating discovery regarding our designed microbe interface system and the microbiome. Evolution has nothing to do with this critical symbiotic relationship. It appears Nitric oxide signaling was clearly designed.
 
References
1. Sherwin, F. 2016. Applying Design Analysis to Microbiome Research. Acts & Facts. 45 (2): 16.
2. New ‘interspecies communication’ strategy between gut bacteria and mammalian hosts uncovered. ScienceDaily. Posted on sciencedaily.com Feb. 21, 2019, accessed March 8, 2019.
3. Sherwin, F. 2018. How Bacteria Help Our Bodies Survive. Creation Science Update. Posted on ICR.org July 26, 2018, accessed March 10, 2019.
 
*Mr. Sherwin is Research Associate is at ICR. He has a master’s in zoology from the University of Northern Colorado.

The Latest
COVID-19
An Ocean of Viruses
A virus is a very tiny structure. In its simplest definition, a virus is some nucleic acid (either DNA or RNA) packed inside a protein coat. It is designed...

NEWS
Inside April 2020 Acts & Facts
How is ICR preparing for our next season of ministry? How does science confirm that turtles have always been turtles? Were dragons really dinosaurs?...

APOLOGETICS
Signs of the Times: Glacier Meltdown
What if meteorologists only got paid if their weather predictions proved to be correct? If so, predicting the weather would be a risky business, like...

ACTS & FACTS
Why Don't They Believe in Creation?
After an ICR scientist presents convincing evidence for biblical creation, listeners often ask, “If all you just said is true, then why don’t...

ACTS & FACTS
Dr. John Whitcomb: A Life Well Lived
The Institute for Creation Research was saddened to hear of Dr. John Whitcomb’s passing on February 5, 2020. It’s been 60 years since...

DISCOVERY CENTER
Dragon Encounters at the ICR Discovery Center
Some of the most eye-opening evidence you’ll find at the ICR Discovery Center for Science & Earth History is located in the Dragon Encounters...

ACTS & FACTS
Ancient Sahara Was Wetter Than Expected
New research has again confirmed the predictions of creation scientists. The Sahara Desert wasn’t always a dry, desolate place. Right after the...

ACTS & FACTS
Turtles Have Always Been Turtles
Turtles (Chelonia) are found in oceans, freshwater ponds, and on land. The Galapagos tortoise is the largest living species of tortoise and, like the...

ACTS & FACTS
Cosmic Rays, Sunspots, and Climate Change, Part 2
Last month’s article described two possible mechanisms by which the sun could affect Earth’s weather and climate.1 Both mechanisms...

RESEARCH
Contamination Claims Can't Cancel Radiocarbon Results
Radiocarbon (C-14) keeps popping up in the wrong places. Carbon-dating labs have struggled to find ancient samples with zero radiocarbon levels. C-14...