Scientists Discover the 'Anternet' | The Institute for Creation Research

Scientists Discover the 'Anternet'

Ants seem to cover the globe. The success of any ant colony depends on the inherent capabilities of its many working members. One of the capabilities of harvester ants relies on an algorithm that governs their foraging frequency. It happens to parallel an internet data management algorithm.

Harvester ants forage for seeds, with each ant carrying one seed at a time back to its colony. If too many ants are out harvesting seeds, ant resources are wasted, and the colony could receive a glut of produce that would create traffic jams and food overstocking issues. That could spell ant disaster. On the other hand, the whole colony starves if they fail to bring in enough seed for food. How do ants keep such tight regulation on this critical task? Researchers were also curious about how harvester ants accomplish this with no central administration.

The answer is that each ant carries its own understanding. By experimenting with harvester ants, biologists determined that when ants return with food more slowly, then more of them know to leave the colony to go foraging. Also, when ants return in large numbers, quickly filling the coffers, fewer go foraging.

Now, biologists and engineers from Stanford partnered together to find that an algorithm commonly used to regulate web traffic and other data streams closely matches that which harvester ants use to regulate harvesting traffic. They published their results in the online journal PLoS Computational Biology.1

They figured that the algorithm in ant brains uses four variables. One describes the rate of outgoing foragers, another describes the amount that the rate increases with each returning ant, and another describes the amount that the rate decreases with each outgoing ant. The study authors related these parameters using two formulae:

  1. an = max(an-1-qDn-1+cAn-d,a), a0 = 0
  2. Dn~Poisson (an)

Who knew ants were so wise?

And of course, harvester ants know so much more. For example, they know what temperature range is healthy for them to forage. They go deep underground during very hot times in the deserts of the Western United States where many of them live. On sunny days, harvester ants usually cease foraging by 11a.m. and restart when temperatures drop to 118-125°F.2 This means that ants have internal thermometers and that those thermometers communicate with their decision centers.

Clearly, ants do not go to school. Thus, they must have been given their wisdom from a source outside themselves.3

References

  1. Prabhakar, B., K. N. Dektar, and D. M. Gordon. The Regulation of Ant Colony Foraging Activity without Spatial Information. PLoS Computational Biology. 8 (8): e1002670.
  2. Moody, J.V. and D.E. Foster. 1979. Notes on the Bionomics and Nest Structure of Pogonomyrmex maricopa(Hymenoptera: Formicidae). In Genoways, H.H. and R.J. Baker, eds. 1979. National Park Service Proceedings and Transactions Series. Biological Investigations in the Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas. 4: 115-121.
  3. Thomas, B. Ant Algorithms Argue against Evolutionary Origins. ICR News. Posted on icr.org, February 17, 2009, accessed September 5, 2012.

* Mr. Thomas is Science Writer at the Institute for Creation Research.

Article posted on September 14, 2012.

The Latest
NEWS
"Stone Age" Surgery
The creation model states that humans were created by God about six thousand years ago—as opposed to evolution that says we came from apes over millions...

CREATION.LIVE PODCAST
Amazing Animals, Obvious Design | Creation.Live Podcast: Episode...
From the pets in our backyard to the creatures that dwell deep within the ocean, the world is home to a fascinating variety of animals. Where did they...

NEWS
Do Bird Embryos Show Evidence of Evolving from Dinosaurs?
The majority of zoologists and vertebrate paleontologists believe that birds are actually flying dinosaurs. This even includes the world’s smallest...

CREATION PODCAST
Seeing Stars At Impossible Distances | The Creation Podcast:...
For millennia, mankind has looked at the stars in wonder. Technology has allowed us to study these magnificent creations, but we still have questions....

NEWS
Fresh Dinosaur Tracks Revive Rankling Mysteries
Droughts across north Texas dried the Paluxy River bed, famous for its dinosaur footprints. Ordinarily, the dinosaur tracks lie buried beneath water-covered...

NEWS
Upright Walking Ancestor?
In 2020, an interesting evaluation of human evolution was made by a Scientific American science writer.  The human saga, we now understand,...

NEWS
Mucin in the Mucous
Most readers would rather avoid the topic of mucous. It’s hardly a dinner-table subject! Regardless, our lives depend on this watery, mucilaginous...

NEWS
God's Gift of Speech
Evolution is so flexible! It can be fast1 or slow.2 It can go forward or backward.3 It can add or eliminate structures—such...

CREATION PODCAST
Do We Have Useless Organs? | The Creation Podcast: Episode 31
Tonsils, the appendix, and the spleen are just a few examples of organs within the human body that many people refer to as "useless," but...

NEWS
James Webb Telescope Data: Challenges for the Big Bang?
Astronomers are thrilled by the extraordinary images provided by the new James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)—but some of the data already contradict...