Australopithecus Ate Like an Ape | The Institute for Creation Research
Australopithecus Ate Like an Ape

Tim Clarey, Ph.D., and Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D.

Secular scientists are continually trying to humanize ape fossils in an attempt to bridge the wide gap between humans and apes to fit their worldview. But, the missing links remain missing. And new research reconfirms that apes have always been apes.

Australopithecus africanus is claimed by many scientists to have lived from about two to three million years ago in open grassland and forests of South Africa.1 A. africanus is one of several Australopithecus species that are similar to chimpanzees in their anatomy which are used by secular scientists to support their notion of human evolution.

Secular scientists routinely confirm Australopithecus species as being nothing more than apes, and this new study is no different.2,3 In a recent paper published in Nature, Renaud Joannes-Boyau of the Geoarchaeology and Archaeometry Research Group at Southern Cross University, New South Wales, Australia, and colleagues reported that A. africanus exhibited seasonal eating patterns, similar to modern apes.1 The authors noted,

Although seasonal changes in ecosystems dominated by tropical grassland (frequently referred to as the savannah biome) are associated with only variations in temperature, important oscillations in rainfall produce lengthy dry and wet periods. This has a considerable effect on food availability, and leads to long alternating periods of abundance and scarcity of nutritious food.1

In order to examine A. africanus fossils for seasonal food variations, the scientists conducted elemental mapping on two first molars from one A. africanus specimen (StS 28) and on a canine tooth from a second specimen (StS 51). Their methods included detailed measurements of barium, calcium, lithium, and strontium ratios. This allowed them to create a comprehensive record of variations in food intake during tooth development.1 For example, barium concentration is heavily tied to the volume of breast milk intake while the ape was growing.

Their results showed overlapping and highly cyclical patterns in Ba/Ca, in Sr/Ca and in Li/Ca ratios, indicating repeated behavior over time.1 They further noted that, “A similar recurring pattern in Li/Ca, Ba/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios has previously been observed in modern wild orangutans (both Pongo abelii and Pongo pygmaeus) up to nine years of age.”

The authors interpreted these patterns as reflective of seasonal (wet and dry seasons) food adaptations in a grassland environment and fluctuations in food availability. But most importantly, the authors confirm the ape-like nature of Australopiths in contrast to humans by stating,

Similarly, the Li/Ca banding pattern—which is also found in modern orangutans and (to a lesser extent) baboons, but is rarely seen in modern Homo [human] samples or in the non-primate mammals that were analysed—suggests complex physiological adaptations to cyclical periods of abundance and starvation.1

Australopithecus africanus ate like an ape because it was an ape. Once again, there is no evidence that A. africanus was in any way or form related to humans. In fact, honest evolutionists themselves have admitted this fact recently in a 2016 Royal Society research paper bearing the provocative title “From Australopithecus to Homo: the transition that wasn’t.”4 In this paper, the authors stated, “Although the transition from Australopithecus to Homo is usually thought of as a momentous transformation, the fossil record bearing on the origin and earliest evolution of Homo is virtually undocumented.”

God made apes and then He made Adam and Eve who were fully human from the start.

References
1. Joannes-Boyau, R. et al. 2019. Elemental signatures of Australopithecus africanus teeth reveal seasonal dietary stress. Nature. 572: 112-115.
2. Tomkins, J. P. 2012. Australopithecus Was a Well-Adapted Tree Climber. Creation Science Update. Posted on ICR.org on November 12, 2012, accessed August 7, 2019.
3. Tomkins, J. P. 2014. Australopith Child Gets an Academic Spanking. Creation Science Update. Posted on ICR.org on September 24, 2014, accessed August 7, 2019.
4. Kimbel, W. H. and B. Villmoare. 2016. From Australopithecus to Homo: the transition that wasn’t. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. 371 (1698): 20150248.

*Dr. Clarey is Research Associate is at ICR and earned his doctorate in geology from Western Michigan University. Dr. Tomkins is Life Sciences Director at ICR and earned his doctorate in genetics from Clemson University.
The Latest
COVID-19
COVID-19 and Evangelicals
On March 27, Katherine Stewart wrote an opinion piece titled “The Road to Coronavirus Hell Was Paved by Evangelicals”1 for The New...

NEWS
It’s Bluebonnet Season!
Now is the season—late March and April—for bluebonnets to blossom in Texas!1 Establishing these beautiful flowers is difficult,...

COVID-19
Fighting Coronavirus with Your PC or Mac
As of March 26, seven hundred thousand people involved in the Folding@Home project are using their home computers to form, in effect, the world’s...

COVID-19
New Study Confirms Suggested Coronavirus Quarantine Period
Medical researchers at Johns Hopkins University have been quickly gathering data from the recent coronavirus outbreak and then evaluating health care policy...

COVID-19
Should Americans Wear Masks for COVID-19?
Watching COVID-19 news reporting on South Koreans and Americans shows one stark difference: South Koreans are wearing some kind of face mask but Americans...

NEWS
Volcanoes, Geoengineering, and the Post-Flood Ice Age
A recent study in March 2020 suggested that sulfur dioxide (SO2) injected into Earth’s stratosphere could fight global warming, with a minimum of...

COVID-19
Mental Immunity
Wash your hands. Use Lysol. Take Vitamin C. Get lots of sleep. In the midst of the coronavirus era, there's enough medical advice floating around...

COVID-19
Coronavirus, Evil, and the Redemption of God
Though the novel coronavirus critically impacts our lives and it is easy to lose hope, God provides us with an eternal hope that will never perish. Our...

COVID-19
White House Briefing on Potential Virus Casualties
Not all White House Press Briefings are of equal importance. But yesterday’s was one of the most informative so far due to the staggering potential...

COVID-19
What New York Times Columnist Katherine Stewart Needs to Know
An Opinion piece for The New York Times by Katherine Stewart1 makes the assertions that President Trump has responded poorly to the coronavirus...