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The rest of all the acts of Asa, and all his might, and all that he did, and the cities which he built, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah? Nevertheless in the time of his old age he was diseased in his feet.

Now the rest of the acts of Nadab, and all that he did, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

Now the rest of the acts of Baasha, and what he did, and his might, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

Now the rest of the acts of Elah, and all that he did, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

Now the rest of the acts of Zimri, and his treason that he wrought, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

Now the rest of the acts of Omri which he did, and his might that he showed, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

Now the rest of the acts of Ahab, and all that he did, and the ivory house which he made, and all the cities that he built, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

Now the rest of the acts of Jehoshaphat, and his might that he showed, and how he warred, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah?

Now the rest of the acts of Ahaziah which he did, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Israel?

And the rest of the acts of Joram, and all that he did, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Judah?

New Defender's Study Bible Notes

1:20 dealt well with the midwives. The midwives had both disobeyed their rulers and lied to them, both of which actions are normally sinful in God’s sight (e.g., I Peter 2:13; Ephesians 4:25), and yet God rewarded them. When situations arise in which the commands of rulers conflict with explicit commandments of God (in this case, the murder of innocent children conflicts with the commandment against murder and also His explicit commandment and promise to Jacob–note Genesis 46:3,4), then God’s word must be obeyed (Acts 5:29) rather than the unlawful orders of men. The midwives protected the infants at the risk of their own lives. What may seem superficially to have been a “false witness” was not “against thy neighbour” (Exodus 20:16), but in hazardous protection of their neighbor, just as was the case with those Christians who hid their Jewish neighbors during Hitler’s pogroms.

2:11 when Moses was grown. Moses was forty years old at this time (Acts 7:23) and, although he had been raised from infancy in Pharaoh’s palace and in all the culture and wisdom of the mighty nation of Egypt (perhaps even being a prospective Pharaoh himself, as the “son” of Pharaoh’s daughter–Exodus 2:10), he still considered the Hebrews to be “his brethren,” and needed his protection. It seems very likely that he had, by this time, come into custody of the ancient tablets which he would later compile into the book of Genesis. Joseph had possibly deposited them in his own vaults for safekeeping.

3:4 Moses, Moses. When God calls a name twice, it is clear that the occasion is of great importance, as here when He called Moses. Note also the double calls: “Abraham, Abraham” (Genesis 22:11); “Samuel, Samuel” (I Samuel 3:10); “Simon, Simon” (Luke 22:31,32); “Saul, Saul” (Acts 9:4); and “Jerusalem, Jerusalem” (Matthew 23:37,38).

6:7 to me for a people. The promise of God to set apart a special people whose identity would be linked to Himself has been reaffirmed again and again, beginning as far back as His rejection of Cain while accepting Abel (Genesis 4:5). It was specially affirmed to Abraham (Genesis 12:1; 15:4,6), and here to Moses and the children of Israel. Finally, He has also chosen all “they which are of faith, the same are the children of Abraham” (Galatians 3:7, 26-29; note also Acts 15:14).

12:41 four hundred and thirty years. This 430 years of “sojourning” in Egypt (Exodus 12:40) seems to conflict with the statement by God to Abraham that his seed would be a stranger in a land that would “afflict them four hundred years” (Genesis 15:13) and the statement by Stephen to the same effect (Acts 7:6). These numbers are not just round numbers (note the stress here on “the selfsame day”). Varied interpretations have been offered for the discrepancy of the thirty years, but the most obvious seems the inference that the first thirty years in Egypt (seventeen years before Jacob died, thirteen years after his death) were years of favor under Pharaoh, but when the new king arose “which knew not Joseph” (Exodus 1:8), then the Israelites were soon resented and persecuted, and eventually enslaved, remaining in such disfavor for exactly four hundred years.

19:19 voice of the trumpet. There seems to have been a host of angels present around Mount Sinai as the Law was being given (note Acts 7:53; Galatians 3:19) and one or more were blowing loudly on the trumpet of God. This, along with the lightning and dark cloud and great quaking of the mountain, made an awe-inspiring spectacle which the people could never forget (or so it would have seemed). Compare the exposition of this scene in Hebrews 12:18-21.

20:4 make unto thee. This is not a prohibition against pictures or statuary, in general, but only against an attempt to replace worship of the Creator with worship of His creation or some created thing in the creation (note Romans 1:21-25). When people attempt to represent God by a graven image of some demonic spirit (or “god”) or by a pantheistic mental construct of the infinite, any such worship or representation (the key phrase is “unto thee”) is blasphemous and is forever prohibited by this key commandment. “We ought not to think that the Godhead is like unto gold or silver, or stone, graven by art and man’s device” (Acts 17:29). It also renders the use of statues and paintings of Christ, as well as angels, in churches, schools, and homes as objects of “veneration” to be at least questionable.

7:26 eat no manner of blood. The prohibition against eating blood began with the Noahic covenant (Genesis 9:4), and continues today (note Acts 15:20,29). The blood both contains and symbolizes life (Leviticus 17:10-13), and thus should not be eaten. Furthermore, modern medical science confirms that blood tends to become septic soon after death, and hence is dangerous to health.

11:2 beasts which ye shall eat. This remarkable 11th chapter of Leviticus is controversial, not only because of its division of animals into clean animals (suitable for eating and for sacrifice) and unclean animals, but also because a great uncertainty exists among Hebrew scholars regarding the identity of many of the kinds of animals as named. The dietary restrictions no doubt were mainly for health and sanitation reasons, as well as ceremonial applications. The latter uses have been removed in the present economy (Acts 10:9-15; I Timothy 4:3-4), but the health and esthetic factors may still be worth consideration.

23:4 feasts of the LORD. Many commentators, ancient and modern, have noted that these seven annual “feasts (or religious festivals) of Jehovah” not only had spiritual value to the Israelites who observed them but also gave prophetic witness to God’s great redemptive work as it would unfold throughout history. Note the order: (1) Feast of the Passover (Leviticus 23:5) testifies of the shedding of the blood of the Lamb of God, “Christ our passover,...sacrificed for us” (I Corinthians 5:7). (2) Feast of Unleavened Bread (Leviticus 23:6-8) speaks of the Lord’s supper, which would be instituted by Him on the night of the Passover and would serve to remind His followers again and again to walk in communion with Him. “Therefore let us keep the feast,...with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth” (I Corinthians 5:8). (3) Feast of Firstfruits (Leviticus 23:9-14) foreshadows the coming resurrection and restoration, “Christ the firstfruits; afterward they that are Christ’s at His coming” (I Corinthians 15:23). (4) Feast of Pentecost (that is “fifty days”–Leviticus 23:15-22) was fulfilled in the descent of the Holy Spirit on the first body of Christian believers after Christ’s ascension, testifying to the world “that God hath made that same Jesus, whom ye have crucified, both Lord and Christ” (Acts 2:36). (5) Feast of Trumpets (Leviticus 23:23-25) is separated by a long period of time from the first four festivals and promises that someday “the Lord Himself shall descend from heaven...with the trump of God,” when “the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible” (I Thessalonians 4:16; I Corinthians 15:52). (6) Day of Atonement (Leviticus 23:26-32) testifies of the certain judgments to come–on Israel, on the nations, on believers and on the lost–when complete separation between unforgiven sinners and perfected saints will be established forever (note the two goats in Leviticus 16, the chapter giving the details of this observance). (7) Feast of Tabernacles (Leviticus 23:33-43) speaks of the coming eternal rest in the Holy City, when “the tabernacle of God is with men, and He will dwell with them, and they shall be His people” (Revelation 21:3).

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