The Whale Fossil in Diatomite, Lompoc, California

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Published in: Creation Ex Nihilo Technical Journal, Vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 244–258, 1995.

© 1995 Answers in Genesis ACN 010 120 304. All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

An on-site investigation at Lompoc, California, has established that the fossilized baleen whale found there in diatomite was not buried while “standing on its tail,” but is tilted because the enclosing diatomite unit is tilted. However, current slow-and-gradual uniformitarian models for diatomite deposition and whale fossilization cannot explain this Lompoc whale fossil in diatomite. Only a local catastrophe involving volcanic activity, a post-Flood event within the biblical framework of earth history, is consistent with all the evidence that demonstrates the whale was catastrophically buried in the diatomite.

Keywords

Diatomite, Fossilized Whale, Miguelita Mine, Lompoc, California, Monterey Formation, Excavation, Fossilization, Inclined Strata, Fish Fossils, Diatomite Deposition

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