Ministers and Stewards | The Institute for Creation Research
 
Ministers and Stewards
 

Worth noting in this challenging passage are the specific word choices. "Minister" is the translators' choice for huperetes, most frequently applied to "officers" of various authorities (John 7:45-46). "Steward" is the somewhat more familiar term, oikonomos, the "house-law" for any enterprise that is large enough to require "officers." The first term denotes authority under higher authority, the second authority exercised within legal boundaries (Acts 5:22,26 and Luke 16:1).

These descriptive titles are certainly applicable to Christian leaders (Paul is applying it to himself in the above context), but they are also standards which all followers of Jesus Christ should emulate. All of us are of the "household of God" (Ephesians 2:19), and "every man" (I Peter 4:10) is to serve each other as "stewards" of God's grace. We serve "under" God's authority, exercising a great responsibility "within" the "law" of God's Word.

The Mysteries of God

The limitation and exercise of authority demanded of the Corinthians was to "minister" and "steward" the "mysteries" (plural) of God. Since the Lord's Kingdom, especially in these latter days, has grown so huge, a unique challenge for each Christian is to select where he or she will serve and give their talents, spiritual gifts, and resources. Certainly one of the criteria by which such a choice is to be made must involve the degree to which the organization is instructing and clarifying the "mysteries of God."

Readers of Acts & Facts are well aware of ICR's emphasis on the creation account and the accuracy of the Biblical record. One "mystery" we are "stewarding" is the nature of the Tri-une Godhead (Colossians 2:2) which displays the character of God (Romans 1:20). We encourage your participation with us because of the unique requirements in our secular and scientific culture that necessitates a concentration of specially trained "stewards" who can refute the designs of the many who deny the mysteries of God.

Cite this article: Henry M. Morris III, D.Min. 2003. Ministers and Stewards. Acts & Facts. 32 (1).

The Latest
NEWS
Fossil Chromatin Looks Young
What are the odds that a buried animal would still have intact DNA after 125 million years? Researchers publishing in the journal Communications Biology...

NEWS
Inside October 2021 Acts & Facts
How is the Lord’s handiwork on display at John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park? Does the universe look old? What can we learn about science and...

NEWS
Two-Volume Series: Restoring the Truth about Origins
The subject of origins continues to attract interest from the public and the scientific establishment. Understanding our origins informs us of who we are...

ACTS & FACTS
Creation Kids: Floods Form Fossils Fast
Christy Hardy and Susan Windsor* You’re never too young to be a creation scientist! Kids, discover fun facts about God’s creation with...

ACTS & FACTS
A Battle for Hearts
Since the ICR Discovery Center for Science & Earth History opened in fall of 2019, tens of thousands of people have walked through our doors. They...

APOLOGETICS
Eating Bugs Isn't Always So Simple
The Lord Jesus Christ deserves glory for why He made Earth’s diverse creatures, and He also deserves glory for the complicated details of how...

ACTS & FACTS
Does the Universe Look Old?
Since distant galaxies are billions of light-years away, some understandably assume that distant starlight must have taken billions of years to reach...

ACTS & FACTS
Hawaii Behind the Scenes
ICR Research Scientist Dr. Brian Thomas and ICR Video Producer Clint Loveness, with help from friends and family, recently shot footage in Maui, Hawaii,...

ACTS & FACTS
Mutation, Design, and Faith
Any alteration in a cell’s DNA sequence is a mutation. These changes can come from copying errors, exposure to chemicals or radiation, or from...

ACTS & FACTS
Another Function of 'Junk DNA' Discovered
For decades, evolutionists suggested that huge sections of our genome (about half) did not actively code for the production of proteins or polypeptides—and...