Can Flood Geology Explain Thick Chalk Beds? | The Institute for Creation Research
 
Can Flood Geology Explain Thick Chalk Beds?

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Published in: Creation Ex Nihilo Technical Journal, volume 8, number 1, pp. 11-15.

© 1994 Creation Science Foundation Published with permission. All rights reserved.

Abstract

Most people would have heard of, or seen (whether in person or in photographs), the famous White Cliffs of Dover in southern England. The same beds of chalk are also found along the coast of France on the other side of the English Channel. The chalk beds extend inland across England and northern France, being found as far north and west as the Antrim Coast and adjoining areas of Northern Ireland. Extensive chalk beds are also found in North America, through Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee (the Selma Chalk), in Nebraska and adjoining states (the Niobrara Chalk), and in Kansas (the Fort Hayes Chalk) (Pettijohn, 1957).

Keywords

Chalk Beds, Flood Geology, Hardgrounds

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