Beetle Mouth-Gears Shout Design | The Institute for Creation Research
Beetle Mouth-Gears Shout Design

Beetles (order Coleoptera) are a unique but common group of insects easily recognized by the pair of shiny forewings covering their body. These protective wing-cases are called the elytra. Beetles make up almost 40% of the described insects in God’s creation. If all zoologists stopped what they were doing and investigated just the Coleoptera, they would easily be busy well into the next century.
 
Beetle research continues to amaze. Japanese biologists recently discovered an astonishing structure within the mandibles (mouth pincers) of the horned beetle (subfamily Dynastinae, AKA, Rhinoceros beetle). The insects were discovered to have complex gear-like structures that operate in “completely synchronous movements.”1 Entomologists at the Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology reported:

A closer examination revealed that each mandible has two gear teeth, and the two sets mesh. As a result, when one mandible moves, so does the other.2
 
In 2013 New Scientist magazine reported unexpected machinery in insect larvae:

The insect Issus coleoptratus is another animal with an unexpected bit of machinery hidden in its body. Its larvae are the first animals known to have interlocking gears, just like in the gearbox of a car.3
 
Did these complex movements and gear teeth come about by time and chance or plan and purpose? Evolutionists would immediately explain that the gears were not designed, but somehow slowly developed piecemeal. However, an evolutionary publication stated, “It might be that gears are easily broken, and as soon as one tooth is sheared off, the mechanism doesn’t work as well.”3 If that’s true, then how could such a mechanism evolve from teeth that just randomly appeared one after the other? A partial gearbox in a car certainly wouldn’t work, nor would living gears that just randomly intermesh and rotate.   
 

The synchronous movements of the mouth gears of the horned beetle shout design, plan, and purpose! Tweet: The synchronous movements of the mouth gears of the horned beetle shout design, plan, and purpose! 

Beetle Mouth-Gears Shout Design: https://www.icr.org/article/beetle-mouth-gears-shout-design/

@ICRscience

#Science #Research

The synchronous movements of the mouth gears of the horned beetle shout design, plan, and purpose! 
 
References
1. Ichiishi, W. et al. 2019. Completely engaged three-dimensional mandibular gear-like structures in the adult horned beetles reconsideration of bark-carving behaviors (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Dynastinae). ZooKeys. 813: 89-110.  
2. Marshall, M. 2019. Rhinoceros beetles have weird mouth gears that help them chew. New Scientist. Daily News.  
3. Marshall, M. 2013. Zoologger: Transformer insect has gears in its legs. New Scientist. Posted on newscientist.com on September 12, 2013, accessed on February 12, 2019.   
 
*Mr. Sherwin is Research Associate is at ICR. He earned his master’s in zoology from the University of Northern Colorado.

The Latest
NEWS
Saharan Dust Cloud Strikes United States
Recently, the southeastern United States was hit by a huge cloud of dust from the Sahara desert that drifted across the Atlantic Ocean. A second such cloud...

NEWS
Seals Help Swedes to Chart ‘Paths of the Seas’
Swedish researchers have recently reported some newly documented “paths of the seas”1,2 thanks to some helpful (and high-tech) Weddell...

NEWS
Design Principles Confer Optimal Light Harvesting in Plants
Photosynthesis in plants starts with the absorption of light energy from sunlight, but scientists have been baffled as to how plants utilize the noisy...

NEWS
Titan Receding from Saturn Faster than Expected
Data obtained from the Cassini space probe show that Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, is receding away from Saturn a hundred times faster than scientists...

NEWS
Evolutionists Struggle to Explain Canadian-Australian Connection
A new species of a split-footed lacewing was recently unearthed in British Columbia, Canada, creating a bit of controversy among secular paleontologists.1...

NEWS
Surveillance Tracing: Red Pandas in Himalayan Nepal
It’s tough to be a red panda in this fallen world, especially after the global Flood. Conservationists are satellite tracking red pandas in...

NEWS
Maine Lobsters Make International News
The life of a Maine lobster is mostly a matter of crawling around on muddy continental shelf seafloors, not far from a coastline. Benthic scavenging is...

NEWS
Should We Grouse About Not Seeing Grouse?
A recent report in Chesapeake Bay Journal laments the decline in ruffed grouse populations in the Chesapeake watershed region of its natural range. Ruffed...

NEWS
Meet Dr. G: Roller Skating, Evangelism, and a Changed Life
Have you heard the news? ICR’s Board of Trustees recently appointed Dr. Randy Guliuzza to be ICR’s new President & Chief Operating Officer....

NEWS
Honeybees: How Sweet It Is, Again
After some scary population downturns and scarier rumors of bee populations crashing, honeybees are making a comeback, populationally speaking.1,2...