God's Story


"Moreover, brethren, I declare unto you the gospel which I preached unto you, which also ye have received, and wherein ye stand" (I Corinthians 15:1).

The word "gospel" comes from the Anglo-Saxon god-spel, meaning "God-story." The Greek word is euaggelion, from which we get our word "evangel," and it means, literally, "a good message," or "good messenger." The prefix eu, or ev, means "good," and aggelion means "messenger." Thus, the gospel is the great story of God, to be preached as by an angel dispatched from God. The word normally is used in the sense of "good news" or "glad tidings," but this good message is specifically God's story, sent to lost men from a loving, caring, saving God.

As our text says, it is a message to be "declared" by its messenger, then "received" (literally, "once and for all") by its hearers. It is the message "By which also ye are saved" (v. 2) and "wherein ye stand." Then, verses 3 and 4 declare the very heart of that which is to be received and believed--the substitutionary death, burial, and resurrection of Christ. It is a dynamic gospel--"the power of God unto salvation" (Romans 1:16) for every true believer.

It is a "glorious gospel" (II Corinthians 4:4) through which Christ "hath brought life and immortality to light" (II Timothy 1:10). It is the "gospel of peace" (Ephesians 6:15) and brings "the fullness of the blessing" (Romans 15:29).

Its duration is "everlasting" (Revelation 14:6) and its foundation is the primeval making of "heaven, and earth, and the sea, and the fountains of waters" (Revelation 14:7) by Christ Himself (Colossians 1:16). The apostle Paul gravely warns against "any other gospel" than this gospel, which he had preached (Galatians 1:8-9). This gospel, this glad story of God's grace in Creation and salvation, is to be preached "to every creature" (Mark 16:15). HMM