And the people stood up all that day, and all that night, and all the next day, and they gathered the quails: he that gathered least gathered ten homers: and they spread them all abroad for themselves round about the camp.
And while the flesh was yet between their teeth, ere it was chewed, the wrath of the LORD was kindled against the people, and the LORD smote the people with a very great plague.
And he called the name of that place Kibrothhattaavah: because there they buried the people that lusted.
And the people journeyed from Kibrothhattaavah unto Hazeroth; and abode at Hazeroth.
 

11:33 the wrath of the LORD. Compare Exodus 16:11-13. In the earlier experience the Lord had graciously supplied quail when the people complained, without rebuking them for questioning Him. Now, however, there was no excuse for their lack of faith. In addition, He had given them the law since that first experience, and they had covenanted to obey it. Thus discipline was doubly justified at this point.

11:34 buried the people. The name Kibroth-hattaavah means “graves of lust.” An ancient cemetery was found in the eighteenth century atop a mountain in this region. It had been mentioned also by a Byzantine monk in the fourth century. The tomb inscriptions were in a form of hieroglyphics but had apparently not been made by Egyptians. Many contained engravings of quails.


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