Whose adorning let it not be that outward adorning of plaiting the hair, and of wearing of gold, or of putting on of apparel;
But let it be the hidden man of the heart, in that which is not corruptible, even the ornament of a meek and quiet spirit, which is in the sight of God of great price.
For after this manner in the old time the holy women also, who trusted in God, adorned themselves, being in subjection unto their own husbands:
 

3:1 conversation of the wives. This promise must apply especially to those wives who become Christians after they have married. Christian women who have willfully married unbelievers despite God’s prohibition against it have no valid claim on God’s answer (I Corinthians 7:39; II Corinthians 6:14). However, God is merciful and forgiving when there is true repentance and confession.

3:2 behold. See note on I Peter 2:12. “Behold” here connotes “closely behold.”

3:3 adorning. See I Timothy 2:9. Although male modesty may not have been a problem in the days of the apostles, the principle of modesty in dress and ornamentation would need to be urged on Christian men as well as women today, especially in these days of flamboyancy and stress on physical attributes.

3:4 meek and quiet spirit. Compare the description of the “virtuous woman” (Proverbs 31:10-31, especially verse 30).

3:6 daughters ye are. This phrase means, literally, “have become daughters” of Sara, in a spiritual sense.

3:6 amazement. That is, with any “hysterical fears,” this often being a characteristic of shallow-spirited, self-oriented women, who have not the deep faith of Sarah (note Hebrews 11:11).


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