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/article/thermometers-and-fish-whats-the-mercury-reading
James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. - For centuries, mercury has been used in thermometers for reading our body temperatures, but now we measure mercury levels to see if seafood is safe to eat.1-4 If you are hungry for fish, maybe trout would be a good choice.1 Nearly half of all...

/article/belugas-select-friends-who-arent-close-kin
James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. - Beluga whales don’t select their friends according to what Darwinists would expect, a new Florida Atlantic University study shows.1,2 The research findings are taken from ten Arctic beluga whale ranges, including Alaska’s Yakutat Bay,...

/article/alaskan-alcids-efficiently-designed-air-water
James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. - Recent research on the flying behavior of Alaskan alcids shows how Earth has two kinds of fluid-filled “oceans”, the liquid ocean of sea-water and the gaseous “ocean” of air.1-3 (Alcids are auk-like birds, such as murres,...

/article/ghost-crabs-growl-by-gnashing-their-gut-teeth
James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. - A recent science news video shows barium-marked fluoroscopy of a ghost crab’s gut teeth in action. The video reveals how that species of crab can control friction of its gastric mill teeth (i.e., teeth inside its digestive gut) in order to...

/article/seals-help-swedes-chart-paths-of-the-seas
James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. - Swedish researchers have recently reported some newly documented “paths of the seas”1,2 thanks to some helpful (and high-tech) Weddell seals, plus some satellite-linked “glider” robots.3-5 Using state-of-the-art ocean...

/article/surveillance-tracing-red-pandas-in-himalayan-nepal
James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. - It’s tough to be a red panda in this fallen world, especially after the global Flood. Conservationists are satellite tracking red pandas in the mountains of Nepal to find out more about the factors that are driving them towards...

/article/maine-lobsters-make-international-news
James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. - The life of a Maine lobster is mostly a matter of crawling around on muddy continental shelf seafloors, not far from a coastline. Benthic scavenging is periodically interrupted by molting and ecdysis.1,2 But Maine lobsters recently made...

/article/should-we-grouse-about-not-seeing-grouse
James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. - A recent report in Chesapeake Bay Journal laments the decline in ruffed grouse populations in the Chesapeake watershed region of its natural range. Ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus), a strikingly beautiful bird that symbolizes wildness, is in...

/article/honeybees-how-sweet-it-is-again
James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. - After some scary population downturns and scarier rumors of bee populations crashing, honeybees are making a comeback, populationally speaking.1,2 After a year of devastatingly bad news,3 bounce-back statistics on honeybee populations are now making...

/article/dolphins-learn-tricks-from-peers-to-catch-fish
James J. S. Johnson, J.D., Th.D. - Dolphins—like other cetaceans such as whales, wholphins, and porpoises—are highly intelligent marine mammals, capable of astonishing feats. A recent University of Leeds study, led by Sonja Wild, adds to what we humans have learned about...

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