First Land Bug Buried in the Flood | The Institute for Creation Research
First Land Bug Buried in the Flood
The Scottish island of Kerrera has produced the earliest known bug in the fossil record, a millipede.1 It was found in Silurian System rocks recently claimed by secular scientists to be 425 million years old.1 Unexplainably, their millipede fossil just seemed to show up, fully-formed as a completely functioning “creeping thing.”

This discovery also caused some consternation with the uniformitarian community. Secular scientists recognize that their evolutionary worldview creates some intense time crunches, forcing them to marvel at the rapid pace that evolution must have proceeded. The University of Texas reported,

The findings offer new evidence about the origin and evolution of bugs and plants, suggesting that they evolved much more rapidly than some scientists believe, going from lake-hugging communities to complex forest ecosystems in just 40 million years.2

“It's a big jump from these tiny guys to very complex forest communities, and in the scheme of things, it didn't take that long," said Michael Brookfield, lead author of the paper published in Historical Biology. "It seems to be a rapid radiation of evolution from these mountain valleys, down to the lowlands, and then worldwide after that."2

However, Brookfield, a research associate at UT Austin's Jackson School of Geosciences and his co-authors, found their millipede fossil is still 75 million years younger than the date estimated by molecular clock dating.2

Something must be wrong with these dating techniques. Seventy-five million years is a big difference. And how did this critter evolve in the first place? Most of the fossils in Silurian and older rocks are marine in origin.

Although it's certainly possible there are older fossils of both bugs and plants, Brookfield said that the fact they haven't been found—even in deposits known for preserving delicate fossils from this era—could indicate that the ancient millipede and plant fossils that have already been discovered are the oldest specimens.2

The authors leave the question of the origin of the millipedes unanswered once again. Where are the ancestors to these millipedes?

This is a recurring problem in the fossil record. No ancestors to trilobites are found in Cambrian System rocks either.3 The list could go on and include nearly every fossil ever found. There are no ancestors to anything found in the fossil record.4

Instead, fossils preserve a record of the progressive flooding of the continents.4 Each fossil type shows up full-formed and functioning—just like this millipede. And even though the millipede was found in rocks dominated by marine fauna, it is no surprise to find a few land critters washed out to sea and buried with marine fossils. After all, a dinosaur was washed 70 miles offshore later in the Flood and was buried over a mile deep.5

The global Flood offers the best explanation for this solitary millipede fossil. God used the Flood to judge the Earth, and it only happened thousands of years ago, not millions.6

Stage image: Fossil millipede Kampecaris obanensis.
Stage image credit: British Geological Survey
. Copyright © 2020. Adapted for use in accordance with federal copyright (fair use doctrine) law. Usage by ICR does not imply endorsement of copyright holders.

References
1. Brookfield, M.E. et al. 2020. Myriapod divergence times differ between molecular clock and fossil evidence: U/Pb zircon ages of the earliest fossil millipede-bearing sediments and their significance. Historical Biology. DOI: 10.1080/08912963.2020.1761351
2. University of Texas at Austin. World's oldest bug is fossil millipede from Scotland. PhysOrg. Posted on Phys.org May 28, 2020, accessed June 1, 2020.
3. Clarey, T. The Cambrian Explosion Mystery Deepens. Creation Science Update. Posted on ICR.org June 19, 2018, accessed June 1, 2020.
4. Clarey, T. 2020. Carved in Stone. Dallas, TX: Institute for Creation Research, 90-113.
5. Clarey, T. and J. J. S. Johnson. 2019. Deep-Sea Dinosaur Fossil Buries Evolution. Acts & Facts. 48 (8).
6. Cupps, V. 2019. Rethinking Radiometric Dating. Dallas, TX: Institute for Creation Research.

*Dr. Clarey is Research Associate at the Institute for Creation Research and earned his doctorate in geology from Western Michigan University.
The Latest
NEWS
Titan Receding from Saturn Faster than Expected
Data obtained from the Cassini space probe show that Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, is receding away from Saturn a hundred times faster than scientists...

NEWS
Evolutionists Struggle to Explain Canadian-Australian Connection
A new species of a split-footed lacewing was recently unearthed in British Columbia, Canada, creating a bit of controversy among secular paleontologists.1...

NEWS
Surveillance Tracing: Red Pandas in Himalayan Nepal
It’s tough to be a red panda in this fallen world, especially after the global Flood. Conservationists are satellite tracking red pandas in...

NEWS
Maine Lobsters Make International News
The life of a Maine lobster is mostly a matter of crawling around on muddy continental shelf seafloors, not far from a coastline. Benthic scavenging is...

NEWS
Should We Grouse About Not Seeing Grouse?
A recent report in Chesapeake Bay Journal laments the decline in ruffed grouse populations in the Chesapeake watershed region of its natural range. Ruffed...

NEWS
Meet Dr. G: Roller Skating, Evangelism, and a Changed Life
Have you heard the news? ICR’s Board of Trustees recently appointed Dr. Randy Guliuzza to be ICR’s new President & Chief Operating Officer....

NEWS
Honeybees: How Sweet It Is, Again
After some scary population downturns and scarier rumors of bee populations crashing, honeybees are making a comeback, populationally speaking.1,2...

NEWS
Dolphins Learn Tricks from Peers to Catch Fish
Dolphins—like other cetaceans such as whales, wholphins, and porpoises—are highly intelligent marine mammals, capable of astonishing feats....

NEWS
Liberty and the Word of God
“And I will walk at liberty: for I seek thy precepts” (Psalm 119:45). July 4th is called Independence Day here in our country because on...

NEWS
Wandering Albatross: Wide Wings on the Winds
Wandering albatrosses have the largest wingspan of any living bird, so they live much of life soaring above the oceans. With their wings—and a lot...