Tadpole Faces Form by Bioelectric Patterning | The Institute for Creation Research
Tadpole Faces Form by Bioelectric Patterning

How does a single-cell egg turn into a swimming, metabolizing, hunting tadpole? Common understanding holds that frog DNA carries the required instructional building plans. However, developmental biologists serendipitously discovered that tiny facial features were outlined with bioelectricity just prior to their formation inside frog eggs.

Tufts University biologist Dany Adams said that when she viewed images of a time-lapse movie of bioelectrical activity in frog embryos, she "was completely blown away."1 The research appeared in the technical journal Developmental Dynamics,2 and a related university news release included a link to the stunning video that accompanied the journal article.

The images show an embryonic frog "light show" in fast forward. Adams said, "When a frog embryo is just developing, before it gets a face, a pattern for that face lights up on the surface of the embryo."1

In this patterning process, an ionic charge is generated on the skin's surface by biochemical proton pumps. To assess whether this bioelectric pattern is crucial to proper development or just an interesting byproduct, the researchers disrupted the biochemical pump that generates electric potential. This affected specific critical genes, which resulted in abnormal tadpole facial development.2 Apparently, the genes are activated by the bioelectricity.

Since bioelectric patterning is not genetic, how could it have arisen through neo-Darwinism's genetic mutations? In other words, since bioelectric signals are required to build tadpoles, and since they are electric and not genetic, then mutations and natural selection are irrelevant to their makeup.

These experiments illuminate the fact that an extremely capable bioelectrical Engineer is behind the intricate processes needed to reproduce living organisms.

References

  1. The Face of a Frog: Time-lapse Video Reveals Never-Before-Seen Bioelectric Pattern. Tufts Now. Tufts University news release. Posted on now.tufts.edu July 18, 2011, accessed July 19, 2011.
  2. Vandenberg, L. N., R. D. Morrie and D. S. Adams. 2011. V-ATPase-dependent ectodermal voltage and ph regionalization are required for craniofacial morphogenesis. Developmental Dynamics. 240 (8): 1889-1904.

* Mr. Thomas is Science Writer at the Institute for Creation Research.

Article posted on July 27, 2011.

The Latest
NEWS
Saharan Dust Cloud Strikes United States
Recently, the southeastern United States was hit by a huge cloud of dust from the Sahara desert that drifted across the Atlantic Ocean. A second such cloud...

NEWS
Seals Help Swedes to Chart ‘Paths of the Seas’
Swedish researchers have recently reported some newly documented “paths of the seas”1,2 thanks to some helpful (and high-tech) Weddell...

NEWS
Design Principles Confer Optimal Light Harvesting in Plants
Photosynthesis in plants starts with the absorption of light energy from sunlight, but scientists have been baffled as to how plants utilize the noisy...

NEWS
Titan Receding from Saturn Faster than Expected
Data obtained from the Cassini space probe show that Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, is receding away from Saturn a hundred times faster than scientists...

NEWS
Evolutionists Struggle to Explain Canadian-Australian Connection
A new species of a split-footed lacewing was recently unearthed in British Columbia, Canada, creating a bit of controversy among secular paleontologists.1...

NEWS
Surveillance Tracing: Red Pandas in Himalayan Nepal
It’s tough to be a red panda in this fallen world, especially after the global Flood. Conservationists are satellite tracking red pandas in...

NEWS
Maine Lobsters Make International News
The life of a Maine lobster is mostly a matter of crawling around on muddy continental shelf seafloors, not far from a coastline. Benthic scavenging is...

NEWS
Should We Grouse About Not Seeing Grouse?
A recent report in Chesapeake Bay Journal laments the decline in ruffed grouse populations in the Chesapeake watershed region of its natural range. Ruffed...

NEWS
Meet Dr. G: Roller Skating, Evangelism, and a Changed Life
Have you heard the news? ICR’s Board of Trustees recently appointed Dr. Randy Guliuzza to be ICR’s new President & Chief Operating Officer....

NEWS
Honeybees: How Sweet It Is, Again
After some scary population downturns and scarier rumors of bee populations crashing, honeybees are making a comeback, populationally speaking.1,2...