Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him.
 

2:12 Kiss the Son. In this final exhortation of the Holy Spirit, concluding the fourth and final three-verse stanza of the psalm, Christ is again acknowledged as the unique Son of God. In Psalm 2:7, the Hebrew word is ben; here it is bar. These two Hebrew words are used to denote sonship. Some modern translations inexplicably change this command to read: “Kiss his feet.”

2:12 Blessed are all they. This is a beautiful evangelical promise. Psalm 1:1 promises blessing to those who do not follow the counsel of the ungodly; Psalm 2:12 promises blessing to those who do trust Christ.

Psalm 3 (title) A Psalm of David. Of the 150 psalms, all but thirty-four have some sort of title affixed to them, and these titles seem to be essentially as old as the psalms themselves. Presumably they should be accepted as part of the inspired text. David’s name is attached to seventy-three of the psalms, but he also must have written at least a few of the anonymous psalms. Psalm 2, for example, does not have David’s name in the text, but Peter ascribed it to him in quoting from it (Acts 4:25).


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