Now when Jesus was risen early the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had cast seven devils.
 

16:9 Now when Jesus. There is an obvious change in Mark’s narrative between Mark 16:8 and 16:9, and many modern scholars believe that Mark 16:9-20 constitute a later addition by some writer other than Mark. Two of the most ancient Greek manuscripts terminate Mark’s gospel with Mark 16:8, even though this would leave it with a very abrupt and unlikely ending. The verses in question do appear in the large majority of the ancient manuscripts, even though they are not as old as “Sinaiticus” and “Vaticanus.” Also, the verses are quoted by at least two of the important church fathers whose writings predate even these two manuscripts. Furthermore, the events described in this passage give every evidence of being true and significant, and there is no internal evidence that it is not a part of the inspired text. Even if it was added later, either by Mark himself or someone else, there is no good reason not to accept it as genuine Scripture.

16:9 first to Mary Magdalene. It is a testimony to God’s grace that Mary Magdalene, once a demon-possessed sinner, was given the privilege of being first to see and speak with the resurrected Christ (see John 20:11-17).


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