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Always bearing about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our body.
Knowing that he which raised up the Lord Jesus shall raise up us also by Jesus, and shall present us with you.
While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal.

New Defender's Study Bible Notes

4:8 yet not distressed. There are at least five divine paradoxes of grace mentioned in II Corinthians 4:8-10—troubled but not distressed, perplexed but not despairing, persecuted but not abandoned, cast down but not destroyed, dying in Jesus yet alive in Him. Compare these to the nine similar paradoxes in II Corinthians 6:8-10. See note on II Corinthians 6:4.

4:13 as it is written. See Psalm 116:10. The comfort of the psalmist in his afflictions was faith in God’s Word, and Paul testified the same of himself.

4:17 light affliction. Paul’s afflictions were hardly “light” by human standards (e.g., II Corinthians 11:23-33). These were only momentary, however, in the scales of eternity, and were “light” in comparison to the “weight” of glory yet to come (Romans 8:18).

4:17 but for a moment. The word here for “moment” is parautikos, meaning “at present.” Compare Luke 4:5; I Corinthians 15:52.

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